Low carbon economy?

 

Low carbon economy? 
A recent survey (The Financial Times, Sept 18, 2009) shows that low carbon products and services are now generating more revenue than the global aerospace and defense sectors. “Climate sector” industries include renewable energy, nuclear energy, energy management, waste and water companies. The global revenue for these industries was $534 billion in 2008, a 75% increase. It seems that, despite the global recession, green is growing.
Will Sami, from sustainability consulting firm Domani, thinks it’s a reflection of the power of innovation. Many of these companies manufacture such products as windmills and fuel cells, or provide services such as climate change and energy efficiency assessments. Calling the growth “impressive,” Will says the statistic even surpasses the growth estimates expected, which forecast that low carbon products and services would reach approximately $500 billion by 2050. The prediction now, is that it could exceed $2 trillion by 2020, based on current trends. 
They growth is attributed to an increased number of companies entering the market, with 268 compared to 154 in 2004. The largest number of companies in this sector were in the US, with a combined revenue of $111 billion. The key growth areas within the sector are low carbon energy production, energy efficiency, control of water, waste and pollution, and climate finance.
This certainly comes as good news to us. As specialists in brand, marketing and differentiation in the green sector, we’ve seen change, both locally and regionally, first hand. But an acceleration of that change, we think, can only be a good thing. Think how much progress can be made with the engine of business growth pushing it. From many accounts,  just in the nick of time.
– Chri
A recent survey (The Financial Times, Sept 18, 2009) shows that low carbon products and services are now generating more revenue than the global aerospace and defense sectors. “Climate sector” industries include renewable energy, nuclear energy, energy management, waste and water companies. The global revenue for these industries was $534 billion in 2008, a 75% increase. It seems that, despite the global recession, green is growing.
Will Sami, from sustainability consulting firm Domani, thinks it’s a reflection of the power of innovation. Many of these companies manufacture such products as windmills and fuel cells, or provide services such as climate change and energy efficiency assessments. Calling the growth “impressive,” Sami says the statistic even surpasses the growth estimates expected, which forecast that low carbon products and services would reach approximately $500 billion by 2050. The prediction now, is that it could exceed $2 trillion by 2020, based on current trends. 
They growth is attributed to an increased number of companies entering the market, with 268 compared to 154 in 2004. The largest number of companies in this sector were in the US, with a combined revenue of $111 billion. The key growth areas within the sector are low carbon energy production, energy efficiency, control of water, waste and pollution, and climate finance.
This certainly comes as good news to us. As specialists in brand, marketing and differentiation in the green sector, we’ve seen change, both locally and regionally, first hand. But an acceleration of that change, we think, can only be a good thing. Think how much progress can be made with the engine of business growth pushing it. From many accounts,  just in the nick of time.
– Chris
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